1. Home
  2. Policy and research
  3. Respect and Responsibility
  4. Curriculum Mapping
  5. Curriculum Mapping - History (Mandatory) Stage 4
Print this page Reduce font size Increase font size

Respect and Responsibility

Promoting values in education

Curriculum Mapping

History (Mandatory) Stage 4
Syllabus links Opportunities for learning

Topic 1 Investigating History

Inquiry questions

  • What is history?
  • How do historians investigate the past?
  • Why is conserving our heritage important?

Students learn about:

  • the process of historical inquiry:
  • differing perspectives
  • history as the study of people
  • heritage issues

Students learn to:

  • examine differing historical perspectives and interpretations
  • identify significant people of the past
  • examine the motives for people’s actions in the past
  • explain the consequences of people’s actions
  • describe some aspects of family/community heritage
  • appreciate the value of preserving and conserving our heritage

Students consider that there are many narratives and differing perspectives in history.

Dimensions of respect and responsibility:

Topic 2 Societies and Civilisations of the Past

Inquiry questions

  • What can we learn about societies and civilisations of the past?
  • What have been the legacies of past societies and civilisations?

Outcome

A student:

4.1 describes and explains the nature of history, the main features of past societies and periods and their legacy

Students learn about:

  • civics and citizenship in the society or period
  • rights and freedoms
  • beliefs and values of the people of the society or period
  • the legacy of the ancient, medieval and early modern world

Students learn to:

  • describe the way in which the people of the society or period were governed
  • describe the rights and freedoms of different groups in the society or period
  • outline the contacts that the society had with other peoples
  • assess the legacy of the society or period for our world cultural heritage

Teachers have the opportunity to choose examples of societies and civilisations which provide clear examples which can engage with significant values such as human rights, freedom and racial discrimination.

Dimensions of respect and responsibility:

Topic 3 Aboriginal and Indigenous Peoples, Colonisation and Contact History

Inquiry questions

  • What can we learn about Aboriginal and Indigenous peoples?
  • What has been the nature and impact of colonisation on Aboriginal, Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples?

Outcomes

A student:

4.2 describes significant features of Aboriginal and Indigenous cultures prior to colonisation

4.3 explains the way Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples of the world have responded to contact with each other

4.7 identifies different contexts, perspectives and interpretations of the past

Students learn about:

  • Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal perspectives of the relationship to land and country
  • differing experiences of contact between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal peoples from 1820 to 1900:
  • land disputes
  • dispossession
  • Aboriginal responses to dispossession
  • increasing government control of the lives of Aboriginal peoples

Students learn to:

  • compare the Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal relationship to land and country
  • explain how Aboriginal peoples outside the Sydney regions responded to the invasion of their lands
  • outline developments in governments’ policies towards Aboriginal peoples
  • explain the results of colonisation for Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal peoples to 1900

Dimensions of respect and responsibility:

Topic 4 Optional Study: The Shaping of the Modern World

Inquiry question

  • How has a significant person, group or event helped to shape the modern world?

Outcomes

A student:

4.1 describes and explains the nature of history, the main features of past societies and periods and their legacy

4.7 identifies different contexts, perspectives and interpretations of the past

Students learn about:

  • the historical context of the person, group or event
  • the impact of the person, group or event on the modern world

Students learn to:

  • describe the main features of the time in which the person, group or event was significant
  • explain the impact of the person, group or event in shaping the modern world

Teachers have the opportunity to choose examples of significant people, groups or events which provide clear examples which can engage with significant values such as human rights, freedom and racial discrimination.

Dimensions of respect and responsibility:

Print this page Reduce font size Increase font size