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Respect and Responsibility

Promoting values in education

Curriculum Mapping

Geography (Mandatory) Stage 5
Syllabus links Opportunities for learning

Knowledge and understanding can be linked to outcomes:

5.6 explains the geographical processes that form and transform Australian environments

5.7 analyses the impacts of different perspectives on geographical issues at local, national and global scales

Through Geography students develop an understanding of Australia and the Australian environment as well as empathy with people from different countries and cultures and an appreciation of the different perspectives that people and communities have on a range of issues. In this way Geography by its very nature promotes the specific teaching of the values of respect and responsibility. Geography has the possibility of drawing on the local community as a resource to provide an immediate point of reference for the study of differences within communities and cultural aspects of the community.

Geography also provides opportunities for students to learn:

  • how people and communities modify, and are affected by, the environment
  • how physical, social, cultural, economic and political factors shape communities, including the global community

Dimensions of respect and responsibility:

Values and attitudes can be linked to outcomes:

5.8 accounts for differences within and between Australian communities

5.9 explains Australia’s links with other countries and its role in the global community

Through the study of Geography, students will develop interest in, and informed and responsible attitudes towards, people, cultures, societies and environments, with a commitment to:

  • ecological sustainability
  • a just society
  • intercultural understanding

Relating content to values of respect and responsibility

These values and attitudes objectives underpin all content in the geography syllabus. Geography offers teachers and students the opportunity to explore the values of respect and responsibility in the programming of curriculum and selection of case study materials. The choices made in case study materials will allow teachers to explore a range of significant values within the study of Geography.

Dimensions of respect and responsibility:

5A1 Investigating Australia’s Physical Environments

Outcome

A student:

5.6 explains the geographical processes that form and transform Australian environments

Students learn about:

The Australian continent

  • the origins of the continent:
    • Aboriginal perspective
    • geographical perspective

Students learn to:

  • explain the origins of the continent from an Aboriginal and geographical perspective

The study of the Aboriginal and geographical perspectives of the origins of the continent develops in students an appreciation of Aboriginal culture, their history and association with the continent. This study develops an understanding of Aboriginal knowledge of the land and the way this knowledge can be utilised today. Through intercultural understanding , respect of other cultures is promoted.

Dimensions of respect and responsibility:

Students learn about:

  • Physical characteristics that make Australia unique

Case study of a natural hazard:

  • the responsibility and responses of individuals, groups and various levels of government to the impact of the natural hazard

Learn to:

  • investigate responses of individuals, community-based groups and different levels of government to the hazard

Students study a natural hazard and the impacts this has on a community. The opportunity exists within the curriculum for students to investigate their own community and how they respond to the natural hazards. Responsibility is promoted when students study the responses of individuals, groups and different levels of government to the hazard. They learn about the responsibilities of various groups in responding to the natural hazard and how they as individuals can play a role in the management of the impact of the natural hazard.

Dimensions of respect and responsibility:

5A2 Changing Australian Communities

Outcomes

A student:

5.8 accounts for differences within and between Australian communities

5.9 explains Australia’s links with other countries and its role in the global community

Students learn about:

Human characteristics that make Australia unique

  • demographic characteristics:
    • age structure
    • distribution
    • ethnic composition
    • gender
    • growth rates
    • population size

Types of communities

  • types of communities in Australia including Indigenous communities
  • differences within and between Australian communities

Factors causing change in Australian communities

  • cultural integration
  • demographic change
  • globalisation of economic activity
  • recognition of native title

Case study of at least one Australian community

Students learn to:

  • describe past and current population patterns in Australia
  • explain how Australia’s changing demographic characteristics are influencing the nature and identity of Australian society
  • describe the factors causing change in Australian communities

Through the study of the Australian community, respect is promoted as students investigate Australia as a multicultural society. The specific study of different types of communities then allows the opportunity to investigate cultural differences and promote intercultural understanding as the contributions and significance of migrants and migrant communities to the development of Australia are promoted. This is taught explicitly as students learn about the factors causing change to Australian communities. Through the study of Australia’s human environment students develop a respect for other cultures and an appreciation of their responsibility to the values and ideals of Australia. Both of these aspects promote tolerance and understanding of differences within the student body and the broader Australian community.

Specifically, individual community studies offer ideal opportunities for schools to develop intercultural exchanges and inter-school programs that promote intercultural understanding and enable students to experience cultures different to their own. Technology has provided new possibilities for cultural exchange without the cost and organisational difficulties associated with a physical exchange. Technology also provides the possibility of immediacy and a visual medium which was not previously available. First-hand experiences like these activities break down stereotypes and promote tolerance and intercultural understanding and are a valuable part of an effective geography program.

Dimensions of respect and responsibility:

5A3 Issues in Australian Environments

Outcomes

A student:

5.6 explains the geographical processes that form and transform Australian environments

5.7 analyses the impacts of different perspectives on geographical issues at local, national and global scales

Students learn about:

Geographical issues

  • geographical issues affecting Australian environments including:
    • air quality
    • coastal management
    • land and water management
    • spatial inequality
    • urban growth and decline
    • waste management

Case study of geographical issues affecting Australian environments:

  • the geographical processes relevant to the issue
  • the perceptions of different groups about the issue
  • individual, group and government responses to the issue
  • decision-making processes involved in the management of the issue
  • management of the issue and implications for sustainability, social justice and equity

Students learn to:

  • describe each geographical issue in relation to:
    • its nature
    • its impacts
    • the responses by individuals, groups and governments to the issue
    • propose actions that promote:
    • sustainability
    • social justice
    • equity
    • evaluate the success of individuals, groups and the levels of government in managing the issue

As students investigate issues in Australian environments they develop an understanding of the methods used to manage these issues and an understanding of the ways they can participate. In this way students develop a respect for their environment and then have the knowledge to take responsibility for the issue and participate in its management.

As fieldwork is mandated in this topic it provides opportunity for students to demonstrate their responsibility (for the environment) by the actions they take and their participation in the management of the issue. In this way community partnerships can be promoted as students work with local councils and other organisations in managing Australia environments.

Dimensions of respect and responsibility:

5A4 Australia in Its Regional and Global Contexts

Outcomes

A student:

5.7 analyses the impacts of different perspectives on geographical issues at local, national and global scales

5.8 accounts for differences within and between Australian communities

5.9 explains Australia’s links with other countries and its role in the global community

Students learn about:

Australia’s regional and global links

  • the ways Australia interacts with other nations:
    • aid
    • communication
    • culture
    • defence
    • migration
    • tourism
    • trade
    • sport

Case study of a regional and global link:

  • cultural, economic and geopolitical advantages and disadvantages to Australia
  • social justice and equity issues in Australia and other countries

Students learn to:

  • collect data to identify and locate nations with which Australia has regional and global links and describe the nature of the links
  • analyse the advantages and disadvantages of the link to Australia
  • recognise implications for social justice and equity in relation to the link

Through the study of the links Australia has to other countries, students develop an understanding of Australia’s global and regional role. This cultural awareness enables students to further develop an understanding of the role Australia as a sovereign nation plays in the region and reflect on the responsibility we as Australians have to the developing nations in the region.

Data can be used to investigate Australia’s historical and current relationships with various countries. Further investigations can be made into Australia’s role in promoting human rights at the international level.

Dimensions of respect and responsibility:

Students learn about:

Future challenges for Australia:
Population

  • current and future population trends:
    • growth rates, age structure and spatial distribution
    • government population policies to manage population growth

Human rights and reconciliation

  • future challenges for Australia in relation to:
    • human rights
    • reconciliation

Students learn to:

  • identify and discuss government population policies:
    • growth rates
    • refugees
    • migration
    • identify human rights agreements
    • describe responses of individuals, groups and governments in Australia to these challenges
    • compare the responses of Australia and other nations to the challenges
    • recognise implications for the international community
    • suggest strategies Australia can adopt to address the challenges better in the future

Geography, towards the end of the Stage 5 course, offers students the opportunity to reflect on the knowledge they have gained and determine the future directions for Australia by investigating the challenges facing the nation. In this way students are empowered with responsibility as they consider the actions of other nations to these issues and propose effective solutions for the Australian context.

Dimensions of respect and responsibility:

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