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Respect and Responsibility

Promoting values in education

Curriculum Mapping

History mandatory Stage 5
Syllabus links Opportunities for learning

Topic 1 Australia to 1914

Inquiry questions

  • What was life like in Australia at the turn of the century?
  • How and why did Federation occur?
  • What were the voting rights of various groups in Australia at Federation?
  • How and why was the Immigration Restriction Act 1901 implemented?

Outcomes

A student:

5.1 explains social, political and cultural developments and events and evaluates their impact on Australian life

5.3 explains the changing rights and freedoms of Aboriginal peoples and other groups in Australia

Students learn about:

  • working conditions in Australia around the turn of the century
  • the reasons for Federation
  • the Australian Constitution
  • voting rights of different groups in Australia at Federation
  • the origins and implementation of the Immigration Restriction Act 1901
  • social legislation 1901–1914, (Harvester Judgement, invalid and old-age pension schemes, maternity allowance scheme)

Students learn to:

  • identify the working conditions of men, women and children
  • describe the main features of the Australian Constitution
  • identify the voting rights of Aboriginal peoples, women and other groups at Federation
  • identify the ethnic composition of Australia at Federation
  • outline the reasons for the introduction of the Immigration Restriction Act 1901
  • explain how the Immigration Restriction Act 1901 was used to restrict immigration
  • outline the major social legislation of the new Federal Government that affected living and working conditions in Australia

Students may approach the study of this period from the perspective of inclusion and exclusion. Identifying which groups were included/excluded in community through voting rights, immigration policy and workers rights.

Dimensions of respect and responsibility:

Topic 2 Australia and World War 1

Inquiry questions

  • Why did Australia become involved in World War I?
  • What were the experiences of Australians in the Gallipoli campaign?
  • What was the impact of World War I on the Australian home front 1914–18?

Outcomes

A student:

5.2 assesses the impact of international events and relationships on Australia’s history

5.7 explains different contexts, perspectives and interpretations of the past

Students learn about:

  • Australia as a member of the British Empire and Australia’s regional context
  • the creation of the Anzac legend
  • the conscription issue in World War I
  • the experiences of one of the following during World War I in Australia
  • persons of German descent
  • women
  • Indigenous peoples
  • Australia’s commemoration of World War I

Students learn to:

  • describe Australia’s relationship with Britain in 1914
  • explain the reasons for Australia’s involvement in World War I
  • describe the experiences of Australians in the Gallipoli campaign using a variety of sources, including a database or website
  • explain how and why the Anzac Legend was created
  • explain how and why the conscription debate divided Australian society
  • describe the experiences of a particular group during World War I in Australia
  • outline the ways that Australia has commemorated World War I over time

Dimensions of respect and responsibility:

Topic 3 Australia between the Wars

Inquiry questions

  • What were the differing experiences of various groups during the interwar period?
  • What was the contribution and significance of ONE Australian, ONE important event and ONE political development during the interwar period?

Outcomes

A student:

5.1 explains social, political and cultural developments and events and evaluates their impact on Australian life

5.7 explains different contexts, perspectives and interpretations of the past

Students learn about:

  • the varying experiences of at least ONE of the following:
  • returned soldiers (1920s)
  • women (1920s)
  • workers (1920s)
  • the unemployed (1930s)
  • the wealthy (1930s)
  • stolen children (1930s)
  • the contribution and significance of at least ONE of the following significant individuals:
  • Rev John Flynn (1920s)
  • the contribution and significance of at least ONE of the following significant individuals:
  • Margaret Preston (1930s)
  • Sir Isaac Isaacs (1930s)
  • the significance of at least ONE important event:
  • the Coniston Massacre (1920s)
  • the Aboriginal Day of Mourning (1930s)
  • the significance of ONE of the following for Australia’s political development:
  • compulsory and preferential voting (1920s)
  • growth of unionism and the establishment of the ACTU (1920s)
  • dismissal of Jack Lang (1930s)

Students learn to:

  • describe the experiences of the chosen group/s
  • explain the contribution and significance of the chosen individual to Australian history
  • explain the significance of the event to Australian history
  • assess the significance of the chosen study to Australia’s political development

Teachers have the opportunity to choose examples of significant people, groups or events which provide clear examples which can engage with significant values such as human rights, freedom and racial discrimination.

Dimensions of respect and responsibility:

Topic 4 Australia and World War II

Inquiry questions

  • Why was Australia involved in World War II?
  • What were some of the experiences of Australians as a result of their involvement in the war?
  • What was the impact of the war on the Australian home front?
  • How did Australia’s relationship with Britain and America change during World War II?

Outcomes

A student:

5.2 assesses the impact of international events and relationships on Australia’s history

5.3 explains the changing rights and freedoms of Aboriginal peoples and other groups in Australia

5.7 explains different contexts, perspectives and interpretations of the past

Students learn about:

  • Australia’s involvement in the war
  • the experiences of Australians serving in World War II, with particular emphasis on ONE of the following:
    • Kokoda or another New Guinea Campaign
    • prisoners of war
    • a campaign in another theatre of war
    • Australian nurses serving in the war
    • the impact of the war on civilians with a particular emphasis on ONE of the following:
    • the internment of ‘enemy aliens’
    • a significant local event or issue
    • wartime government controls including:
    • conscription
    • manpower controls
    • rationing
    • censorship
    • Australia’s changing relations with Britain and the USA during World War II

Students learn to:

  • explain the reasons for Australia’s involvement in World War II
  • describe the experiences of Australians serving in World War II, with emphasis on the chosen study
  • explain the impact of the war on Australian civilians with a particular emphasis on the chosen event or issue
  • describe the controls on civilian life imposed by the wartime government
  • outline arguments for and against such controls in wartime
  • explain how and why Australia’s relationship with Britain and the USA changed during World War II

Dimensions of respect and responsibility:

Topic 5 Australia in the Vietnam War Era

Inquiry questions

  • How did the Australian government respond to the threat of communism after World War II?
  • How did Australia become involved in the Vietnam War?
  • How did various groups respond to Australia’s involvement in the Vietnam War?
  • What was the impact of the war on Australia and/or neighbouring countries?

Outcomes

A student:

5.1 explains social, political and cultural developments and events and evaluates their impact on Australian life.

5.2 assesses the impact of international events and relationships on Australia’s history

5.3 explains the changing rights and freedoms of Aboriginal peoples and other groups in Australia

5.7 explains different contexts, perspectives and interpretations of the past

Students learn about:

  • Australia’s response to the threat of communism in Asia after World War II including:
    • Korean War
    • ANZUS Treaty
    • SEATO Alliance
  • the response to the threat of communism within Australia including:
    • referendum to ban the Communist Party
    • the Petrov Affair
  • differing views of Australia’s involvement in the Vietnam War, eg:
    • supporters of the war
    • conscientious objectors
    • the moratorium movement
  • the impact of the war on ONE of the following:
    • Vietnam veterans and families
    • Indo-Chinese refugees
    • Australia’s relations with Asia

Students learn to:

  • explain the purpose of treaties Australia contracted during this period
  • outline the key developments in Australia’s response to communism within Australia
  • explain reason’s for Australia’s involvement in the Vietnam War
  • explain the reasons why different groups within Australia supported or opposed Australia’s involvement in the Vietnam War
  • assess the impact of the war on the chosen study

The study of the Vietnam War era provides further opportunities to consider the use of propaganda as well as issues such as war refugees etc. Students have the opportunity to reflect on protest and dissent in the peace movement.

Dimensions of respect and responsibility:

Topic 6 Changing Rights and Freedoms

Inquiry question

  • How have rights and freedoms of Aboriginal peoples and other groups in Australia changed during the post-war period?

Outcomes

A student:

5.1 explains social, political and cultural developments and events and evaluates their impact on Australian life

5.3 explains changing rights and freedoms of Aboriginal peoples and other groups in Australia

Students learn about:

Section A: Aboriginal Peoples

Change over Time

  • changing government policies towards Aboriginal peoples over time, including:
    • protection
    • assimilation
    • integration
    • self-determination

Group

  • the varying experiences of the stolen generations

Events/Issues

  • the role of the following in the struggle of Aboriginal peoples for rights and freedoms:
    • 1967 Referendum
    • Land Rights and Native Title

Section B: Migrants

Change over Time

  • the changing patterns of migration 1945–2000

Group

  • the experiences of ONE of the following:
  • a migrant group in post-World War II period
  • ‘enemy’ aliens in World War I or World War II

Events/Issues

  • the role of ONE of the following in the history of post-World War II migration:
    • Snowy Mountains Scheme
    • 1970s boat people
    • multiculturalism

Section C: Women

Change over Time

  • the achievements of the women’s movement in the post World War II period

Group

  • the experiences of women’s liberationists in post-World War II period

Events/Issues

  • the role of ONE of the following in the changing rights and freedoms of Australian women:
    • women’s suffrage
    • women in parliament
    • equal pay for women

Students learn to:

  • account for continuity and/or change over time in the relevant study
  • examine the experiences of chosen group/s using a range of sources
  • explain the significance of the event/issue for the changing rights and freedoms of the chosen study

The study of the changing rights and freedoms provides significant opportunities to identify the extent of injustices visited upon Indigenous people as a result of European settlement as well as the ongoing effect of such dislocation and social upheaval. The study of migration provides opportunities to develop cultural awareness and recognise the ongoing needs of migrants, particularly those who have left their homeland under duress. The study of women provides opportunities to look at the development of equal opportunities for women and the obstacles that remain.

Dimensions of respect and responsibility:

Topic 7 People Power and Politics in the Post-war Period

Inquiry questions

  • What role has Australia played in international affairs in the post-war period?
  • How have significant individuals and groups exercised their democratic rights in the post-war period?

Outcomes

A student:

5.1 explains social, political and cultural developments and events and evaluates their impact on Australian life

5.2 assesses the impact of international events and relationships on Australia’s history

5.3 explains the changing rights and freedoms of Aboriginal peoples and other groups in Australia

5.7 explains different contexts, perspectives and interpretations of the past

Students learn about:

Section A: Australia as a Global citizen

Australia’s role in the following:

  • United Nations, including UNESCO, and UN conventions
  • regional agreements including Colombo Plan, APEC

Section B: People Power:

  • one of the following individuals and events/issues:
    • Freedom Rides
    • Charles Perkins
    • Women’s Liberation
    • Germaine Greer
    • Green bans
    • Jack Mundey
    • Whitlam dismissal
    • Sir John Kerr
    • Green politics
    • Bob Brown
    • Republicanism
    • Paul Keating
    • One Nation
    • Pauline Hanson

Section C: Prime Ministers and Policies

  • one Prime Minister in the post-war period

Students learn to:

  • outline key developments in Australia’s role within the UN in the post-war period
  • assess an achievement of Australia in its role within the UN
  • explain the purpose of Australia’s regional agreements
  • assess the significance of the chosen study (People Power) for Australia in the post-war period
  • outline and explain a major policy or issue of the term of office of the chosen Prime Minister
  • assess the contribution of the chosen Prime Minister to Australia’s post-war development

Teachers have the opportunity to choose examples of individuals who provide clear examples of engagements with significant values such as human rights, freedom and racial discrimination.

Data can be used to critique Australia’s historical and current relationships with various countries and to identify prejudices which influence these relationships. Further investigations can be made into Australia’s role as a pioneering force for human rights at the international level and its current stance on international human rights protocols.

Dimensions of respect and responsibility:

Topic 8 Australia’s Social and Cultural History in the Post-war Period

Inquiry question

  • What have been the major social and cultural features of a post-war decade?

Outcomes

5.1 explains social, political and cultural developments and events and evaluates their impact on Australian life

5.2 assesses the impact of international events and relationships on Australia’s history

5.7 explains different contexts, perspectives and interpretations of the past

Students learn about:

Decade Study

  • The social and cultural features of ONE post-war decade including:
    • fashion
    • music
    • entertainment
    • sport
    • British or American influences on popular culture

Students learn to:

  • describe the main social and cultural features of the chosen decade
  • outline the main influences of Britain or the USA on Australian popular culture of the chosen decade
  • assess the impact of the chosen decade in shaping Australian identity

Dimensions of respect and responsibility:

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