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  5. Textiles and Design Major Textiles Project - Frequently Asked Questions
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Major Textiles Project (MTP) – Frequently Asked Questions

  • How can students briefly cover the history of one focus area?

    The keyword in the ‘learn to’ is briefly. The expectation is that only the key events that affected, and were therefore significant in, that particular focus area are recorded.

  • Can students do one aspect of the focus area, eg apparel – hats?

    Yes, students can do one aspect of the focus area.

  • What is a contemporary designer?

    This includes designers who are influencing current trends. The intention of the syllabus is that it is relevant to design today and therefore relevant and of interest to students.

  • Does the contemporary designer have to be famous?

    No. The intention of the syllabus is that the designer is relevant to design today and therefore relevant and of interest to students.

  • What is the time span for ‘contemporary’?

    When the syllabus was written, the intention was that ‘contemporary’ would mean that students studied content that was relevant to current designs and designers and which would be relevant to them. Examples of definitions are:

    ‘existing or lasting at same time; of same age; present-day’ (Collins)

    ‘living or happening in the same period of time’ (Webster’s).

  • Contemporary designers – can they be dead?

    Yes, assuming that they are still having an influence, their work relates to present-day design and is ‘up-to-date’.

  • How old does something have to be before it ceases to be an innovation?

    The expectation is that teachers look at what is happening now in relation to fabric, yarn or fibre development, and that students may be able to relate this to practices and media articles they see.

  • If a student changes their Major Textiles Project idea totally but the inspiration remains the same, should they include all of the documentation?

    No, students should submit only what relates to the final Major Textiles Project. Projects will be assessed using the marking guidelines.

  • For the two case studies required for marketing, must the companies be Australian?

    Yes, because the section is within the Australian Textile, Clothing, Footwear and Allied Industries.

  • What is the situation if a student attends extra classes (outside of school), eg patchwork, but still completes all the work him/herself?

    This is similar to any student who receives subject tutoring outside normal school hours. This situation is acceptable, assuming that the student completes all practical work themselves. All direct assistance with a student’s work must be appropriately acknowledged. The student should advise the teacher of this assistance.

  • Can Textile Arts be defined as multimedia?

    No.

  • Can Textile Arts be defined as ‘sculpture’ which uses fabric and fibre?

    This type of project needs to be checked against the Criteria for Examining the MTP in the Marking Guidelines. Assuming that each of the criteria can be addressed in the project, then this example of a Textile Art may be acceptable.

  • Where do I find the requirements that apply to the Major Textiles Project?

    In the Board of Studies

    • Assessment Certification and Examination (ACE) website, ACE 9016-9021, Submitted Works and Practical Examinations
    • Textiles and Design Syllabus
    • Assessment and Reporting in Textiles and Design Stage 6
  • What layout would be appropriate for the order of construction?

    • It is up to the student to decide the most appropriate method for communicating all details accurately and clearly. This may involve the student researching how this is done in the industry related to the focus area that they have selected. Possible layouts may include flow charts, mind maps, reports and lists of steps.
  • What scale do students need to use when drawing pattern pieces?

    This is up to the student, and will depend on space availability and general layout considerations.

  • If students are producing a range of garments, eg six pieces, how much is expected to be included in the manufacturing specifications section?

    This is a decision for the student. For example, the student may decide to include all of the range in the supporting documentation, including the textile item/s assessment. Or, they may decide to include all of the range up to the end of the visual design development section, then do only the manufacturing specifications and investigation, experimentation and evaluation for one item.

  • Regarding historical/cultural/contemporary factors, is a written section needed for this?

    Yes. Information needs to be included about this in the design inspiration section of the supporting documentation and it is up to the student to decide how it will be presented.

  • With regard to the manufacturing specifications, do the drawings need to be rendered?

    No. The drawings in this section of the supporting documentation are not rendered since this section is specifically about communication of exactly how the item/s is to be reproduced by the manufacturer.

  • In the Criteria for Examining the MTP, students are required to critically analyse the functional and aesthetic aspects of the design, considering strengths and weaknesses, with reference to the elements and principles of design. Is there an outcome related to this?

    The elements and principles are assumed knowledge from the Preliminary course. Reference to aesthetics and functional requirements is made in objective one. Outcome P1.1 refers to the elements and principles and the accompanying HSC outcome H1.1 links each of these areas together. Therefore, it is reasonable for students to ‘critically analyse the functional and aesthetic aspects of the design, considering strengths and weaknesses, with reference to the elements and principles of design’, as specified in the Criteria for Examining the MTP.

  • In the manufacturing specification section:
    (a) how can proportion be shown?

    In this section, dimensioning is used to convey the exact measurements of a textile item. Proportion of an item is conveyed in the visual design development section.

    (b) do all textile items need to have production drawings completed both to scale and in proportion?

    All production drawings must be completed in proportion and where appropriate for the textile item/s then to scale.

  • Can commercial care labels be used by students?

    No. In the ‘learn to’ section of the syllabus, students learn to ‘design and produce a label/s suitable for the Major Textiles Project item/s’. This means that students need to develop a prototype label/s and include it either on the item/s or in the supporting documentation. If the label is attached to the item/s (ie it doesn’t appear in the supporting documentation), consideration needs to be given to the security of the label attachment.

  • How should production drawings for a textile art, like a wall hanging, be drawn?

    Students could do a full-scale drawing on graph paper then reduce it to fit within the supporting documentation page length limits. Students need to ensure that they include detail of the surface decoration so that a manufacturer could reproduce the item accurately.

  • Does the itemised costing include stationery costs as well?

    No. Itemised costing includes all items that were required to produce the textile item/s.

  • Where do I find information on innovations in fabric, yarn and fibre development?

    Useful sources of information include current textiles journals and the CSIRO website.

  • Is a bibliography required?

    All source material must be acknowledged as specified in the Board of Studies HSC: All My Own Work publication and all direct assistance with student work must also be acknowledged in the supporting documentation. A bibliography is not listed as part of the Criteria for Examining the MTP.

  • Who will judge creativity? What will the specifications be?

    Assessment of creativity will be based on the Marking Guidelines for the MTP. Students need to ensure that they incorporate ‘creativity’ into their Major Textiles Project.

  • Who determines the degree of difficulty? What is difficult for one student may not be for another.

    The degree of difficulty is up to the student in relation to their Major Textiles Project. Students need to ensure that they have totally explained and justified the inclusion of particular design features and/or specialised fabrics and/or specialised or advanced construction techniques and/or application of decorative techniques.

  • Do students submit their toile if they have made one, or is the photograph explaining extensive alterations adequate?

    It is up to the student to decide on the inclusion of a toile in the supporting documentation. Consideration needs to be given to the impact on page length.

  • What are the limiting factors in defining specialised fabrics?

    There are no limiting factors. Students need to ensure that they clearly justify the use of this fabric through investigation and experimentation.

  • Can students use recycled clothing for fabric pieces and/or pattern pieces?

    Yes. Students need to ensure that they clearly justify the use of recycled fabrics/garment components through investigation and experimentation.

  • Can students include a title page at the beginning of the supporting documentation?

    Title pages are not required. Students need to ensure the supporting documentation strictly adheres to the maximum specifications as stated in the syllabus, Criteria for Examining the MTP. If headings are used, they should also follow the criteria sections.

  • Are title pages for each section and contents pages counted as part of the page limit for supporting documentation?

    Title and contents pages are not required and if included are counted in the maximum specified pages. Students must comply with the maximum specified page limits using either A3 or A4 size pages for each section.

  • Can students do a combination of both A3 and A4 pages?

    Students need to ensure that they don’t exceed the maximum page length in a section. At the same time, consideration needs to be given to contemporary presentation and clear communication of all aspects of the Major Textiles Project. Students should choose EITHER A3 OR A4 size pages for the complete supporting documentation, not a combination of both.

  • What is meant by one A4? Does it mean one side only or do both sides count as one A4?

    One A4 or A3 means one side of the page only.

  • Resource availability varies between metropolitan and country schools. How will students not be disadvantaged?

    Students need to adapt to the resources available.

  • Does the pattern-making for the project have to be the student’s own work?

    No. Students may use a commercial pattern or have the patterns made by someone else. However, this must be acknowledged in the supporting documentation.

  • Who should teachers contact if they need assistance when teaching the syllabus and the Major Textiles Project

    For clarification of an aspect of the syllabus, contact the Board of Studies. With regard to implementation of the syllabus (eg resources, programs, training and development), contact the relevant education system and professional association.

  • Can a student be penalised if they misinterpret the focus area? For example, when does an item of apparel become an item of costume?

    Students need to ensure that they reinforce their choice of textile item/s in relation to the focus area in the design inspiration section of the supporting documentation.

  • For projects that use materials other than textiles (eg metal), will the metal component be considered in the marking process?

    Only the textile material will be considered in relation to level of creativity/innovation, degree of difficulty and degree of proficiency in manufacture. Other components will be considered in relation to appropriate design (including functional and aesthetic aspects), inspiration, visual design development and management of item/s to completion.

  • Can the MTP be vacuum packed?

    No. The packaging specifications given are based on normal packaging procedures. It is reasonable to assume that the MTP can be easily placed in the same packaging for return after marking.

  • Will individual students be penalised when choices of the MTP are similar, eg multiple evening dresses in the one class?

    No. Each student will prepare their own supporting documentation that will relate specifically to their MTP. It would be expected that the various components such as design inspiration, visual design development and contemporary presentation would vary from student to student. The teacher certifies that projects are the students’ own work.

  • Do students need to submit a diary with the project?

    No. Diaries do not form part of the Criteria for Examining the MTP.

  • Do teachers need to keep a progress diary on each student?

    It would be useful to maintain a brief record of student progress so that if evidence is required for some reason, it is available.

  • What focus area are hats, shoes and bags?

    Generally Apparel, but they could also relate to the Costume focus area.

  • Is there a restriction on font size?

    The maximum folio size for project documentation is A3. A clear and easily read font, equivalent in size to 12-point Times New Roman, should be used for text. See page 10 of the Assessment and Reporting in Textiles and Design Stage 6 for the criteria relating to the supporting documentation.

  • Is it okay to use experiment samples from Preliminary projects?

    Students should experiment with materials, equipment and manufacturing processes applicable to the MTP item and modify design and/or construction as a result of the experimentation.

  • Is it okay to scan experiments into your portfolio?

    It is important to provide thorough details and evidence of materials, equipment and manufacturing processes used and to justify their use on the basis of comprehensive investigations.

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