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Board of Studies New South Wales

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Diabetic provisions

Rules and procedures for the Higher School Certificate examinations

Print version of this leaflet (PDF)

If you have further questions, please contact the Student Support Services Branch on
(02) 9367 8117 or
(02) 9367 8325

studentsupport@bos.nsw.edu.au

This leaflet should be distributed to students granted diabetic provisions, their parents, presiding officers, examination supervisors and Year 12 co-ordinators.

What are diabetic provisions?

Diabetic provisions allow students to:

  • have small group supervision or be seated near an exit, to leave the room if necessary
  • take bite-sized food and drink into the examination room
  • take blood glucose testing equipment into the examination room to monitor their blood glucose level (BGL)
  • take their insulin syringe or insulin pump into the examination room for use as necessary, or wear their insulin pump into the examination room (pump may be worn at all times)
  • have five minutes per half hour without access to the exam paper or responses, that can be used to eat, drink, go to the toilet or check their blood glucose level
  • take remedial action of up to 20 minutes if the blood glucose level is below 5 mmol/L or above 15mmol/L.

NOTE: Students must not have access to their examination questions and answers during any extra time associated with diabetic provisions.

How is hypoglycaemia (low blood glucose level) treated?

Treatment of hypoglycaemia requires immediate consumption of sweet food or drink, followed by slowly absorbed carbohydrate, for example, a sandwich or banana.

What happens if a student needs to take remedial action?

If the student’s blood glucose level falls below 5 mmol/L, the student may have one period of up to 20 minutes to take remedial action and retest their blood glucose level. If, after 20 minutes, the blood glucose level is still below 5 mmol/L, an illness/misadventure appeal may be submitted. The student’s blood glucose levels should be included in the appeal. The student may elect to keep working.

How is hyperglycaemia (high blood glucose level) treated?

Hyperglycaemia will cause frequent urination and thirst, leading to the need to drink and visit the toilet frequently. Additional insulin (given either by injection or insulin pump) is needed to reduce the blood sugar level.

What happens if a student needs to take remedial action?

If the student’s blood glucose level is above 15 mmol/L, the student may have one period of up to 20 minutes to take remedial action and retest their blood glucose level. If, after 20 minutes, the blood glucose level is still above 15 mmol/L, an illness/misadventure appeal may be submitted. The student’s blood glucose levels should be included in the appeal. The student may elect to keep working.

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